CRRF is actively involved in a number of research initiatives of interest to rural audiences.

Canadian Regional Development: A Critical Review of Theory, Practice and Potentials

This multi-year project is investigating how Canadian regional development has evolved over the past two decades and the degree to which Canadian regional development systems have incorporated New Region- alism into their policy and practice. This initiative is working with five regions: Eastern Ontario, Kittiwake (Newfoundland), Kootenay (BC), Rimouski-Neigette (Québec), and the Northern Peninsula (Newfoundland). For further information visit http://cdnregdev.ruralresilience.ca.

Rural Policy Learning Commons

The Rural Policy Learning Commons is a 7-year Partnership project established in 2014 to enhance Canadian prosperity by: (i) identifying and analyzing policy options relevant to rural and northern places, (ii) evaluating these options in the context of national and international policy innovations, and (iii) building leadership capacity among rural and northern researchers, policy-makers, and practitioners. Furhter information on the Rural Policy Learning Commons can be found at http://rplc-capr.ca.

The Influence of Lines and Boundaries on Collaboration

Regions are becoming increasingly important for planning, sustainability, and social development. Throughout Canada, multi-community strategies are being employed to issues far ranging, such as to address economic development opportunities to the formation of hockey teams. What happens when a provincial boundary cuts across the region? What are the implications of this ‘line’ on regional cooperation and collaboration?

Pathways to Prosperity

This national initiative focuses on fostering welcoming communities that promote economic, social, and civic integration of immigrants and minorities in Canada. Using academic scholarship and community expertise the research initiative is conducting primary research across the country. This initiative engages researchers from over 50 universities, all levels of government, and local/regional actors. For further information visit http://p2pcanada.ca.